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PC World - Product reviews
  • Moebius: Empire Rising review: A point-and-click 'adventure' against the game itselfMoebius: Empire Rising review: A point-and-click 'adventure' against the game itself

    A dastardly conspiracy? Historical guess-who? Shadowy government agency?

  • Lenovo ThinkPad 8 review: Fancier CPU and display take a toll on battery lifeLenovo ThinkPad 8 review: Fancier CPU and display take a toll on battery life

    Sure, you can now use Microsoft Office on an iPad, but you can run Office and just about every other productivity app on a Windows 8 tablet. And while many of those devices have all the same specs, Lenovo is banking on its ThinkPad 8's faster CPU, higher-resolution display, and business-like styling to earn a coveted spot on your desk.

  • MOBILedit review: put your PC and phone in syncMOBILedit review: put your PC and phone in sync

    You might think of your smartphone and your PC as two entirely separate entities, never needing to cross paths. Or, perhaps you use the desktop software that comes free with your phone, finding that it meets all of your syncing needs. However you choose to sync—or not sync—your smartphone, MOBILedit should have you rethinking your decision. This comprehensive tool offers almost everything you need to manage your smartphone from your computer.

  • ZoneAlarm Extreme Security review: antivirus that lives up to its nameZoneAlarm Extreme Security review: antivirus that lives up to its name

    Chances are, when you need a security suite you first look to the big players: Symantec, Kaspersky, McAfee, or Trend Micro. But Check Point’s ZoneAlarm Extreme Security is a full suite that offers protection on a par with those brands: In independent tests, ZoneAlarm managed almost-perfect protection, excellent performance, and just one false positive.

  • Linksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we’ve testedLinksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we’ve tested

    When Linksys first showed me a WRT1900AC prototype last year, I thought to myself, wow: I hope its performance lives up to its audacious looks. The good news is that it does—for the most part. In fact, it’s the fastest router I’ve ever tested. The bad news is that its $280 MSRP marks it as the most expensive router I’ve ever tested (Linksys launched the router with a $250 sale price).

  • Winoptimizer 11 Review: Everything you need to tune up your PC under one roofWinoptimizer 11 Review: Everything you need to tune up your PC under one roof

    I’m always suspect of programs that claim to make Windows run faster. Windows 7 and 8 don’t need a lot of help in that regard, and in the past some optimizers have messed up my system. But darn if Ashampoo’s Winoptimizer 11 doesn’t provide some facilities that made my system run faster, albeit by a small margin. But even a small margin is welcome, and the program gathers a ton of useful features under one roof, facilitating an easy tweaking and optimizing experience—something you might not get around to if you stuck with the myriad freebies.

  • Betrayer review: Amazing atmosphere isn't enough to save this odd shooterBetrayer review: Amazing atmosphere isn't enough to save this odd shooter

    My longbow is cracked. It's nearly worthless in this state. It's also the only thing standing between me and an army of Spanish conquistadors, hell-bent on my blood. An army that may or may not be in my mind.

  • Diablo III: Reaper of Souls review: Finally, the Diablo III we've been waiting forDiablo III: Reaper of Souls review: Finally, the Diablo III we've been waiting for

    I don't know how Blizzard did it. Diablo III was the pariah. It was broken forever. It was the poster child for everything you shouldn't do when updating a beloved game for the modern era. (Well, before SimCity came out.)

  • CorelDRAW X7 review: Customizable features make this robust design program very easy to use

    CorelDRAW turned 25 this year. That’s longer than Microsoft Office has been around—but just like the popular productivity suite, this vector editor just won’t quit. Its latest release, X7, sports a flatter look that feels at home on current Windows machines. It’s not a revolutionary update, but it’s more customizable and more connected than ever before. 

  • HP EliteBook Folio 1040 G1 review: Thin, light laptop makes business a pleasureHP EliteBook Folio 1040 G1 review: Thin, light laptop makes business a pleasure

    HP set out to make a corporate notebook that handles the basics and travels well. And the company’s EliteBook Folio 1040 G1 pulls it off—for the most part. The Folio’s file storage is tighter than the overhead bin in a puddle-jumper, and its display panel feels flimsy, but it does a good job of covering the rest of bases.

  • IObit PCTransfer Review: A little help transferring your data from XPIObit PCTransfer Review: A little help transferring your data from XP

    Microsoft no longer supporting XP doesn’t invalidate it as an operating system—the controllers running the tunnel boring machine here for San Francisco’s new subway use XP. However, it may just spur you to finally check out the more secure and robust Windows 7 and 8, especially as the Redmond giant has promised us a real Start Menu for the latter. If you decide that it’s time, a transfer utility such as IObit’s free PCTransfer could prove handy—though it doesn’t do much you can’t do on your own.

  • AMD Radeon R9 290X2 review: If you have the cash, AMD has the compute powerAMD Radeon R9 290X2 review: If you have the cash, AMD has the compute power

    AMD has launched the latest salvo in the gaming video-card arms race: the Radeon R9 295X2. Featuring two of AMD’s best graphics processors, 8GB of GDDR5 memory, and a preinstalled liquid cooling system, AMD claims this is the fastest video card on the market. And with a price tag of $1500, it’s also the most expensive.

  • Seagate Backup Plus Fast review: Double the capacity, double the speedSeagate Backup Plus Fast review: Double the capacity, double the speed

    Seagate has upped the performance ante for portable backup hard drives by stacking two 2TB drives, striped in RAID 0, inside its Backup Plus Fast USB 3.0. Since it writes half the data to one drive and half to a second drive at the same time, you should theoretically get nearly twice the performance.

  • Foxit Phantom PDF review: An easy alternative to Acrobat for editing PDFsFoxit Phantom PDF review: An easy alternative to Acrobat for editing PDFs

    If Foxit Software’s Phantom PDF did nothing other than open multiple documents as tabs, I’d probably like it. My days with stacks of separate windows are over, and unfortunately, that’s the way both Adobe Acrobat XI and Nuance’s Power PDF handle multiple documents. But I also like Phantom PDF because it’s a highly capable PDF editor. For everyday use, it compares quite favorably with the aforementioned competition, and costs less as well.

  • Aegis Padlock SSD Review: Small, fast, FIPS-secure, and expensiveAegis Padlock SSD Review: Small, fast, FIPS-secure, and expensive

    Apricorn’s Aegis Padlock SSD offers a number of advantages over rival secure storage solutions. It delivers more capacity than the ubiquitous secure thumb drive, being available in capacities of 120-, 240-, and even 480GB, while remaining considerably smaller than the usual 2.5-inch portable SSD. It also has an on-board keypad that you can use to access the data stored inside it. Finally, you can use it with any device that can connect to USB mass storage, not just computers.

  • Nuance Power PDF Standard review: An affordable Acrobat alternative with minor flawsNuance Power PDF Standard review: An affordable Acrobat alternative with minor flaws

    When it comes to creating and editing PDF files, it doesn’t get much better than Nuance’s new Power PDF Standard. And with 95 percent of the features of Acrobat at only one-third the cost ($90), it’s a bargain. That said, the interface, while easy to use, needs a tad more work.

  • SOS Online Backup offers a lifeline to those concerned about data privacySOS Online Backup offers a lifeline to those concerned about data privacy

    Online backup is a great thing, and there are a lot of companies offering it. But many farm out your data to storage sub-contractors and are reluctant to share even basic facts about how they go about their business. Even large concerns such as Microsoft and Google are reticent to provide details. SOS Online Backup owns all its own data centers and is very forthcoming about how they handle your data. Add affordable pricing, online access, and support for mobile devices and you have a storage service worthy of the name.

  • Goat Simulator review: Goat + physics sandbox = dumb funGoat Simulator review: Goat + physics sandbox = dumb fun

    What kind of madness hath the Internet wrought this time? Something dumb. Real dumb—and yet something hilariously fun at the same time.

  • Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon review: Slightly overdone, but plenty tastyLenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon review: Slightly overdone, but plenty tasty

    Lenovo took its sweet time cooking up Haswell versions of its flagship business Ultrabook line. While there are signs the 2014 ThinkPad X1 Carbon spent too much time in the test kitchen, it’s still the best notebook I’ve laid hands on.

  • Folder Size review: Free tool shows the distribution of your disk spaceFolder Size review: Free tool shows the distribution of your disk space

    Folder Size provides a breakdown of exactly what is taking up the most space on your hard disk, or any portion thereof. This can be extremely useful if you’re trying to figure out why disk space is lower than expected or if you want to know just how much storage you’re wasting on email archives from 2002 and grade-z public domain monster movies from Internet Archives. And by “you,” I mean, “me.”

Spotlight
  • 'Xbox One Hotel' to open in Paris
    Relaxnews - 2013-11-13 2:45 PM

    To mark the launch of its latest games console, Microsoft France will transform the Hôtel O in Paris into a space dedicated entirely to the Xbox One.

  • Most plan on starting holiday shopping earlyMost plan on starting holiday shopping early
    thecanadianpress.com - 2013-11-04 5:15 PM

    Nearly three-quarters of Canadians recently polled say they plan to start their holiday shopping early this year, and will use the Internet to check and compare prices before buying gifts, two holiday retail studies suggest.

  • Five things you must do to prepare for the end of BlackBerryFive things you must do to prepare for the end of BlackBerry

    With BlackBerry on life support, it’s time to accept the likelihood that there won’t be a BlackBerry a year from now